Saturday, September 26, 2015

Quilting with Rulers: Double Curved Crosshatching

Working on my ruler work sampler again, this time using the double 'S' curve ruler from Rhonda Beyer. This was actually my very first ruler purchase way back when I first decided to experiment with the Janome ruler foot.

Quilting with rulers on a domestic sewing machine-using a double S curve ruler for crosshatching
Because of the asymetrical nature of this ruler, I marked the first two lines to make sure it was even.

Nothing like starting out with one of the more tricky rulers. This ruler has two different curves and they aren't symmetrical. I use a piece of tape to mark where I want to start or end my curve. Then when I'm ready to do the other side, you've got to flip it over to get the mirror image curve.

double curved crosshatching

It's a great ruler, but don't set it aside mid-project as you might have a hard time figuring out the position to get the correct curve when you start back to it. Several minutes were lost today as I tried to remember which side I was using and which orientation.

quilting with rulers double curved crosshatching

Because of the asymmetric curves, sliding the ruler down or up along the line of stitching can throw things off. So you've got to be careful if you want very uniform spaced crosshatching.

pretty feathered corner with double curved crosshatching done on a sewing machine and using quilting rulers

But it does result in some very graceful effects. I'll be using this ruler in all four corners. I will be doing some variations in each corner too. I like how it turned out, even if doing these pretty formal feathers is a bit difficult to get fairly uniform.

Don't forget that Craftsy's got another great sale going on. You can use my special instructor link to get the best sale prices on ALL the classes.

I'll be doing a more in-depth post about using this ruler next week and maybe shoot a video. What rulers, if any, are you using in your quilting lately?

10 comments:

  1. Love what you are doing on this quilt, Amy. Is there one go to curve ruler for you? I would like to get one, and not sure which to try. i only have the Versa tool.

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    1. Marjorie,

      That is an awfully hard question! It’s a lot like asking what’s your favorite fabric. I find that it depends on your style of quilting, size of blocks and/or spaces you’re going to use the ruler in, and your machine set up (big/small harp, high/low shank). Different sizes and shapes are very handy. Since you’ve already gotten a VersaTool, you’ve got 2 smaller curves so I would recommend a larger, more open curve like the 8 or 12 Arcs from Westelee, or the larger QPC curves.

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  2. So beautiful! Ruler work is amazing. I've got one so far and done minimal quilting with it, however I hope to do more soon. I invite you to link to WIPs Be Gone and share your genius.

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    1. I don't know about genius, but I've got WIP's galore!

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  3. I love what you created there. I have done as total free motion and it was fine for me but yours is so neat. The ruler sounds very tricky to use. Great tips. thanks !

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    1. The rulers are a good way for me to stay uniform without marking. Otherwise, I like to just go wild with the swirls and such of free motion. They rein me in, so to say.

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    2. They really are easier to use than you’d think. I have a ton of students tell me so!

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  4. WOW, that is cool, Amy! Marking the starting and stopping points on the ruler with painter's tape is genius. I have a similar difficulty when I'm using a French curve for pattern alterations, trying to find the right part of the curve for an armscye or something. I'm storing that tip away for sure! As for your feathers -- they rock. We always look at our own quilting with our eyes 2" from the quilt and see every "imperfection" but really, it's not imperfections or mistakes so much as the slight differences that are the hallmark of FMQ versus computerized quilting. My goal is to someday make feathers that look as good as yours, not perfectly identical feathers that look like they were stitched out by some machine in a factory!

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  5. Love your work and your Cratsy class. Is the S ruler able to be used with the low shank Westelee foot?

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    1. The key with using full 1/4 inch thick rulers with most low shank machines is that they won't fit behind the foot (under the presserfoot bar). So you can use them to the sides and front of the foot with no problem.

      The trick then is to make sure the positioning of the quilt and ruler isn't going to go under that needlebar/run into the back of the foot. The more the ruler curves, the harder to use on a lowshank machine. The double S ruler does have a good curve, but you can use it on a low shank machine. Extra positioning and moving of the quilt might be needed to avoid the back of the foot area.

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